Share the Road

The “Share the Road Sugar Land” program is an educational series focusing on specific aspects of road safety within our city. It is a call to all who use our city's roads and sidewalks whether in a vehicle, on a bike, or on foot to utilize a few basic safety tips. The goal is to raise awareness on how together, we can make our roads safer for all.

Questions?

For any questions regarding the Share the Road program call 281-275-2226

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Featured Safety Tip

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Bicyclist Etiquette

Bicyclists choosing to enter the roadway must follow the same rules and laws as any motorist on the street and should take advantage of bicycle lanes, when available.

Check out our handy guide below or download and print for your own use.

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Other Safety Tips

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Crosswalk Etiquette

Motorists must yield to pedestrians in a crosswalk, and motorists are prohibited from entering a crosswalk when a pedestrian is crossing the street.  

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Pedestrian Etiquette

Pedestrians should utilize sidewalks if available. If a sidewalk is not available, and they choose to enter the roadway, pedestrians should walk against traffic so they can see and be seen by oncoming traffic.     

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Sidewalk Etiquette

This segment of the educational series is designed to increase sidewalk safety whether riding a bicycle, jogging, or walking on the sidewalk, or on one of our many hike and bike trails located within the city.

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Runner Etiquette

Runners should utilize sidewalks if available. If a sidewalk is not available, and they choose to enter the roadway, runners should jog against traffic so they can see and be seen by oncoming traffic.  

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Approaching a School Bus

When a school bus is stopped for the entry or exit of passengers, it is unlawful to pass that bus until the red flashing lights are off.

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Motorist Etiquette

Motorists should be mindful of all pedestrians, runners, and bicyclists on the road. Do not use mobile devices or engage in other distractions while driving. Motorists should yield to pedestrians, runners and bicyclists who are on the roadway or in a crosswalk. In the event a motorist passes a vulnerable road user, such as a stranded motorist or bicyclist, they should pass with caution and give the vulnerable road user at least 3 feet of clearance. When a bicyclist is in a dedicated bike lane, motorists should pass with care. When making a right hand turn in front of a bicyclist, it is the responsibility of the motorist to ensure the bicyclist will not be cut off. If there is not enough time to pass before the bicyclist arrives at the corner, then wait for the bicyclist to pass.         

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Emergency Vehicle Etiquette

When an emergency vehicle (Police, Fire, or EMS) has activated their overhead lights all vehicle must yield to the emergency vehicle.  Motorist must immediately start reducing their speed, pull to the right hand side of the roadway as far as possible, and completely stop if necessary.  Once the emergency vehicle has passed, the motorist may safely re-enter the roadway when it is safe to do so.  Motorist should stay at least 500 feet   behind an emergency vehicle when the overhead emergency lights are activated.   

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Distracted Driving

In 2017, the Texas Legislature passed a statewide no texting and driving law. In addition to this law, Sugar Land encourages motorists to put the phone down while driving for any reason.  

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The 3-Foot Rule

The three-foot rule is a best practice of road safety that necessitates a motorist to stay at least three feet away from a “vulnerable road user;” this includes bicyclists, pedestrians/runners, road workers, and stranded motorist to name a few. If the motorist is driving a commercial vehicle the distance increases from 3 feet to 6 feet.